Joint Applications

Applying as a Couple or With a Friend

 

Applying as joint applicants (i.e. applying with someone else; husband/wife, boyfriend/girlfriend, friend) is possible but coordinating jobs is sometimes difficult when two people have specific job requests (i.e. age groups, location, starting date, sector, etc.)

Please Note:  A joint application refers to two or more people who plan on teaching together. For information on dependents (e.g. bringing someone else to Korea who won’t be working) please visit our taking dependents page for details.

 

About joint applications in the PUBLIC school sector

Most of the education offices in Korea now have a coordinated policy for couples and friends. There are 2 different policies for joint applicants in this sector. The 1st policy is for legally married couples who have a valid marriage license or certificate. Married couples can request and secure shared accommodations in almost any city or province across Korea. As a married couple Gone2Korea can coordinate each person with employment contracts at separate schools (in the same area) and a centrally located apartment that’s suitable for 2 people. Note: Both applicants will need to pass the interview stages in order for this scenario to work out.

The 2nd public school policy is aimed at couples who are not legally married and people who are applying with a friend. Assuming both applicants pass the interview stages then it’s usually quite easy for Gone2Korea to coordinate couples and friends with jobs and apartments in the same area. Unfortunately public schools will only offer shared accommodations to legally married couples; however, as long as both people are willing to accept different apartments in the same area (sometimes in the same building) then securing jobs in any city or province is a realistic request. Note: Both applicants will need to pass the interview stages in order for this scenario to work out.

Please note: Recruiting companies have zero control over public school housing policies – housing policies are implemented by the education offices.

Please note: Common law partnerships do not qualify for the same benefits as legally married couples.

 

About joint applications in the PRIVATE school sector

Private schools in Korea don’t have a coordinated policy for couples and friends; however, it’s becoming increasingly difficult to coordinate joint applicants in this sector because most schools tend to view joint applicants as a potential risk. Many private schools are reluctant to offer shared housing and jobs at the same school because they’re worried that if one person doesn’t like the job, country, culture, gets sick, etc. and decides to leave early then chances are the other person will leave early as well thus leaving the school with the burden of replacing 2 teachers in the middle of the semester instead of one. Couples are usually easier to accommodate than friends and 2 female joint applicants are usually easier to place than 2 male joint applicants. Note: It was relatively easy for Gone2Korea and other recruiting companies to coordinate joint applicants a year or two ago when the job market wasn’t as competitive. Unfortunately things have changed (more teachers than jobs these days) so the schools are less willing to accommodate couples and friends when they have so many individual applications to choose from.

We regret to say that Gone2Korea is not able to accommodate all joint applicants in the private school sector. We obviously do our best to accommodate as many joint applicants as possible, and we do accommodate a lot, but the reality is we’re limited to the market conditions and what we’re able to help you with depends on when you apply, the number of schools we have that are willing to offer joint employment, the number of joint applications we’re receiving and your interview results and availability of documents. If we’re unable to help joint applicants secure employment at the same school then we’ll do our best to match both applicants up with jobs in the same area as an alternative.

 

Can joint applicants request shared accommodations if they work at separate schools?

Very seldom are recruiting companies able to coordinate this request for couples or friends. Why? Because two separate schools usually aren’t willing to collectively invest in a shared apartment – there are too many risks involved. Secondly, most Korean apartments are leased on a 2 year term and schools don’t want to get stuck with a vacant shared apartment the following year unless they know they’ll be hiring another couple again.

 

Can joint applicants request housing allowance as an alternative to the provided accommodations and secure an appropriate apartment independently?

Yes, this is sometimes possible but it’s not a simple request. Why not? The very large majority of apartments in Korea operate on a system called ‘key money deposits’. Unlike the West, which usually requires a down payment of the first and last month’s rent in order to secure an apartment, most apartments in South Korea operate on a much different system. Key money deposits essentially require a large down payment from the respective tenant which can cost anywhere between 10 million KRW ($9,000USD) to 50 million KRW ($45,000USD) – it’s a huge amount. Secondly, many Korean apartments can only be leased on 2-3 year terms which make things even more complicated if you only plan on staying for a year. Many schools will essentially offer an extra 300,000 – 500,000 per month as a housing allowance but they rarely offer the key money deposit unless you take the apartment they’ll willing to provide; therefore, westerners would need to cover the initial down payment on their own…which most people simply can’t afford. Furthermore, it’s not easy finding an apartment in a foreign country unless you speak the language; meaning, unless you’re fluent in Korean then finding an apartment, negotiating a contract and finalizing the paperwork wouldn’t be easy.

Again, we do our best to accommodate as many joint applicants as possible and we’ll make alternative offers whenever joint employment isn’t possible.